A Spoil of Office

A Spoil of Office

A Story of the Modern West

The three great movements of the American farmer, herein used as background--the Grange, the Alliance, and the People's party--seem to me to be as legitimate subjects for fiction as any war or crusade. They came in impulses with mightiest enthusiasms, they died out like waves upon the beach; but the power which originated them did not die; it will return in different forms again and again, so long as the love of liberty and the hatred of injustice live in the hearts of men and women.to say a few words." Mr. Jennings, a fat and jolly farmer, came to the front looking very hot. His collar had long since melted. "I aint very much of a speech-maker, Mr. President, brothers and sisters. Fact is, I sent my boy down to the seminary to learn how to talk, so't I wouldn't haf to. I guess he represents my idees purty well, though, all except this political idee. I don't know about that. I aint quite made up my mind on that point. I guess I'd better leave the floor for somebody else." "Glad you left the floor," whispered Milton to his father as he sat down by his side. Milton was a merciless joker, especially upon his father. "We have with us to-day," said the chairman, in the tone of one who announces the coming in of the dessert, "one of the most eloquent speakers in the State, one whose name all grangers know, our State lecturer, Miss Ida Wilbur." The assembly rose to its feet with applause as a slender young woman stepped forth, and waited, with easy dignity t

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